Time Doesn't Really Heal All Wounds

Does time heal all wounds? People often say it does. Today's article will discuss the truths and myths regarding this statement.
Time Doesn't Really Heal All Wounds

Last update: 28 May, 2021

Does time really heal all wounds? Some pain is so deep that it tears your soul. It’s as if you were in a deep abyss with no way out. You should know that time doesn’t always do the job.

Life has ups and downs, and every person is unique and manages them in their own way. The truth is that people often find it hard to overcome certain situations as their emotions overcome them. They don’t even know where to start.

People often say that time heals all wounds and that you should just wait until it does. This isn’t always the case, though. Continue reading to discover several reasons why.

“Oh time, great Healer, pass over me and let me forget.”

-Betty Smith-

A person crying.

Does time heal all wounds?

You’ve probably heard someone say that time healed a given painful wound. Did it really? Think about it. It’s hard for deep wounds to heal when you just sit around and let time go by. Perhaps you’re no longer sensitive to it but has it really healed?

Why does this happen? You may not want to acknowledge that pain and prefer to fill your time with activities and not think about it. Perhaps you just stay away from any stimuli that make you think of certain memories. Thus, it can be a masked emotion. Pain doesn’t always manifest as sadness. In fact, it often manifests as anger or even euphoria.

Thinking about this can help you keep your emotions and thoughts at bay

No words can describe some types of pain. In these cases, people try to encapsulate it and send it to the most hidden place of their memory.

It’s a defense mechanism to expel desires, feelings, and thoughts from your consciousness. According to Sigmund Freud, the father of psychoanalysis, it’s a way of getting rid of anything that’s unacceptable to you.

A sad woman.

Does time heal all wounds when you’re passive?

As you can see, you attribute a responsibility that belongs to you to an external agent when you let time go by and expect it to heal all wounds. It’s like letting things pile up on a book you must return to the library, hoping the pile will erase it, as it keeps it out of sight.

The danger is that what remains buried doesn’t fail to erode your motivation or weigh down your willpower. Thus, you can reach the point in which you’re in pain without knowing what’s exactly hurting you.

Furthermore, what could happen is that attributing the leading role to time, when it shouldn’t have it (it’s a mere stage), means underestimating or relegating those strategies you were able to put in place to shape those scars that you created.

This can be an obstacle to overcoming future difficulties. Thus, the idea that time heals wounds can be one of your worst enemies.

Thus, you must accept pain, express it, and transform it in order to become more resilient and have a better quality of life.

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  • Riso, W. (2006). Terapia cognitiva. Fundamentos teóricos y conceptualización del caso clínico. España: Editorial Paidós.