Psychology

In this category, you’ll find articles related to our mental world like abilities and processes. It contains information on how our thoughts, feelings, and emotions make up who we are and how we learn.

Polarized Thinking: A Cognitive Distortion

Polarized thinking is a cognitive distortion. In other words, it’s a reasoning mistake we make without realizing it. It makes us process information incorrectly and this leads to emotional distress. Cognitive distortions were described by Albert Ellis and Aaron Beck. In…

Psychophysiology: What Is it?

Psychophysiology is the branch of psychology that studies the physiological foundation of the brain’s psychological processes. It analyzes behavior and the processes behind it. Since its beginnings in the 19th century, it has always studied the same thing. However, technology…

Bronfenbrenner’s Ecological Systems Theory

Bronfenbrenner’s ecological systems theory is one of the most accepted explanations regarding the influence of social environments on human development. This theory argues that the environment you grow up in affects every facet of your life. Social factors determine your way of thinking,…

Rationality After a Conflict

Is it possible to be rational after a conflict? After a conflict, thinking rationally and cooperating with the other person seems difficult, even if it’s for your own good. It’s even less common in a group setting. If your group has…

Psychological Tests: Characteristics and Function

Just as we use scales to measure our weight, psychologists resort to psychological tests to learn more about anxiety, emotions, and personality, among other things. Now, it’s important to mention that these tests are only useful if they meet quality…

The Von Restorff Effect

The von Restorff effect is our natural tendency to remember things that stand out from the rest. This is why some people call it “the isolation effect”. It was discovered in 1933 by Hedwig von Restorff, whose research led him to…

The Dunning-Kruger Effect

The Dunning-Kruger effect is a cognitive bias that makes less competent people overestimate their abilities and more competent people underestimate them. We’ve all experienced or witnessed this at some point in our lives. When ignorant people think they know everything…

Hans Eysenck’s Model of Individual Differences

Hans Eysenck is one of the most respected names in the history of psychology. Many people credit him for bringing psychology into the scientific world. As a result, he’s often referred to as “the father of psychology”. Hans Eysenck was born…

My Fear of Illness Is Killing Me

Everyone has a fear of illness. It’s one of the most universal fears, related to the fear of death or the fear of madness. A healthy person doesn’t want to die since their self-preservation instinct is intact. But sometimes, this fear of…

Self-Actualization: The Key to Human Potential

Mahatma Gandhi, Viktor Frankl, and Nelson Mandela are great examples of self-actualization. According to the self-actualization theory, each one of us must decode what’s inside us. This is an intentional, responsible, and creative personal growth that makes us fight in order…

The Negative Effects of Too Much Alone Time

A part of our DNA makes us social beings. Humans need others to survive both physically and psychologically. That doesn’t mean we’ll take any company we can get, but it does mean that people are important to us. Research has even shown…

All about Integrative Behavioral Couple Therapy

According to Riva (2012), integrative behavioral couple therapy is one of the third generation therapies. This therapy is focused on private experiences (emotions and thoughts), acceptance, and mindfulness. It also pays special attention to the functional analysis of behavior as…

Spencer Kagan and Cooperative Learning

Spencer Kagan is a renowned author who has carried out multiple studies on cooperative learning. This type of teamwork is different from the way professors transmit knowledge in the vast majority of schools and institutes today. In fact, it’s a new…

The Waves on the Shore Metaphor

The waves on the shore metaphor is a tool therapists use in acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), which belongs to the group of third wave therapies. In a clinical context, this tool is helpful for taking power away from negative…