The Best Is Yet to Come

· July 30, 2016

It’s not hard to imagine why certain popular proverbs have become so popular, such as “the past was always better.” This saying, opposite of “the best is yet to come,” originated from a nostalgic view, especially from older people who have already lived for many, many years. They say it due to nostalgia for everything that has happened in their lives.

However, longing for something that has been lost prevents us from enjoying the things we still have left to live. That’s why, the past is not always better; instead, the best is yet to come.

We have the marvelous ability of being surprised over and over again. This is something we shouldn’t take for granted. Because there are always new things to know, learn and feel on our skin.

“I don’t believe that the past was better. Start to explore the past, and you’ll also discover horrible things.” 
-Jorge Amado-

I want life to go my way

We want to be happy no matter what, which many times makes us commit the mistake of forgetting that happiness demands a small amount of tears. In other words, it has to rain first for a rainbow to come out. Both things are a part of nature. Happiness and tears complement each other and are both equally as real and obligatory.

woman and branches with flowers

We want life to go our way, but we don’t accept that this implies every kind of moment: good and bad, falling off a mountain time and time again until you reach the top.


We usually don’t accept that life lets us live fully until we value everything positive it offers us. It shakes us up and urges us to grow. That’s why the best is yet to come. Because the mountains, just like emotions, are infinite until we cease to exist.

Life starts at 40

They say that life truly starts at 40. By this stage we have lived enough to start admitting that the past is learning and sometimes nostalgia.

It’s here that we understand that the future is illusory because it depends on the present, and that this present is the only thing that molds what’s yet to come: we have the opportunity to improve continuously and not go backwards.

“The future goes by many names. To the weak is it the unreachable. To the frightened, the unknown. To the brave it is opportunity.” 

-Victor Hugo-

At forty, we start to notice that happiness doesn’t depend of anyone other than ourselves. Then we start to also demand what we truly deserve from life: we love ourselves a bit more, are more humble and dream more coherently. That is to say, we understand our limits and have experienced enough falls to know that there is always something better.

Stop settling for memories and make new ones: the best is yet to come

When we leave behind adolescence and youth, we may feel tempted to relive past moments over and over. Remembering becomes more frequent the older we get, and that’s not a negative thing. The negative thing is to stay back, remembering the bad moments and forgetting “today”.

We can’t ever forget the here and now of our lives, because as we’ve said, that is the only place where you can establish the necessary principles for tomorrow. Likewise, remembering is not a bad thing either, neither is dreaming. We need dreams that keep us full of hope and life. However, we can’t let dreams make us get lost within our own reality.

“Don’t live in the same year sixty-five times,
over and over again,
and call it life.”
-Robin Sharma-

woman with hair in wind

The best is yet to come from the moment you accept all of this: a past that serves as a tool to support yourself in the present and a future that holds our curiosity, but which allows us to keep our feet on the ground.

The best is yet to come. There is always a glimmer of possibility that helps us grow and not become stagnated.